Skip to main content

Wrigley Field

On my recent visit to Chicago I attended a Cubs game at Wrigley Field.


Wrigley Field is located in the North Side neighborhood of Chicago and is bounded by the irregular street configuration of; Addison Street, Clarke Street, Waveland Avenue, Sheffield Avenue,  The view above is from Addison and Clarke looking at the main entrance to Wrigley Field.  Below is a close-up view of the "Wrigley Field home of Chicago Cubs" sign.


Wrigley Field is the second oldest Major League Stadium after Fenway Park in Boston.  Wrigley Field opened in 1914 as Weeghman Park and was home to the Chicago Whales of the Federal League.  The Federal League shuttered in 1915 and the Chicago Cubs became the residing Major League Team.  The Chicago Cubs previously played at the second iteration of West Side Park before moving to Wrigley Field.  In 1918 William Wrigley Jr. (of Wrigley Chewing gum) obtained controlling interest of the Chicago Cub and gave Wrigley Field it's modern name in 1926.

Despite recent renovations Wrigley Field still appears similar to how it would have looked in the late 1920s.  The upper deck of Wrigley Field was installed in 1927 and the signature ivy outfield fence was planted in 1937.  Wrigley Field remains the only Major League Stadium without padded outfield walls.


The video board was part of the recent Wrigley Field renovations and was installed in 2015.


Interestingly rooftop viewings of Wrigley Field from nearby buildings is still very much active.  The Chicago Cubs originally attempted to block the roof top viewing areas with a screen in 2003 but began a 17% profit sharing agreement in 2004 which lasts until 2023.  Some of the exterior viewing areas above Sheffield Avenue can be seen in the picture below.


It still seems strange the Cubs won a World Series in 2016 after not winning one for more than a century.


How the Cubs logo appeared in the 1908 season which also happened to be the year they last won a World Series prior to 2016.


It should be noted that the temperature by the time the 7th Inning hit was 34F degrees with 15-20 MPH gusts coming in off of Lake Michigan.  I hadn't attended a Cubs game at Wrigley Field since the late 1990s and felt odd attending in conditions that would have expected more in a Chicago Bears game or at Ryan Field.  The Cubs ultimately lost to the Pirates 5-2.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Signed County Route J37; the last Signed Tulare County Route and the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road

Recently I drove the entirety of Signed County Route J37 located in rural Tulare County.  Signed County Route J37 is notable in that it is the last Signed County Route which actually has field signage left in Tulare County and was intended to be part of a Trans-Sierra Highway known as the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road.


While researching California State Route 190 and more specifically the gap in the highway over the Sierra Nevada Range it became quickly apparent that there was far more to J37/Balch Park Road than initially thought.  The previous blog on California State Route 190 can be found here:

California State Route 190; the Trans-Sierra Highway that could have been 

On the above blog I attached an article from 1926 written by the Los Angeles Times detailing the route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road which was slated to begin construction in 1927.  The route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road would have followed Carroll Creek southward out…

Paper Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains; CA 48 (ii), CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249

In this edition Paper Highways the planned California State Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains are explored.  This issue will cover the planned routes of; the second CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249.



Part 1; the wholesale Legislative Route adoptions of 1959

CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249 prior to the 1964 State Highway Renumbering all were adopted as planned Legislative Routes ("LRN") in 1959.  Part of the planned LRN 267 west of Lancaster was already part of the existing CA 138 on LRN 59.  CA 48 east of Lancaster was planned as LRN 267 which was to have an eastern terminus at LRN 266.  LRN 266 was planned to originate from CA 2/LRN 61 near La Canada Flintridge and cross north/northeast over the San Gabriel Mountains into the Mojave Desert near Palmdale.  LRN 266 was planned to continue northeast from Palmdale to former US 466/LRN 48 near Hawes.  LRN 266 became CA 249 and CA 122 during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  LRN 269 was planned to be rou…

Former US Route 99,US Route 466, and California State Route 65 through Famoso

This past weekend I explored the alignments of US Route 99, US Route 466, and California State Highway 65 through Famoso.



Part 1; The history of State Highway service in Famoso

Famoso is a ghost town and former Southern Pacific Railroad siding located in northern Kern County on Poso Creek.  The site of Famoso is located roughly at the junction of CA 99 and CA 46.  Famoso was founded as a Southern Pacific Railroad siding known as "Poso" during the early 1870s when the Southern Pacific Railroad was building it's main freight line through San Joaquin Valley.  The name of Poso was changed in 1888 to Spottiswood when the community received a spur line of the Southern Pacific and Post Office Service.  The community name of Poso was already in use by a mining community to the west in San Luis Obispo County which required a new name be chosen to establish Post Office Service.  The name of Spottiswood was changed to Famoso in 1895.

Famoso was an important early highway junction in…