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Florida Update Review and down the pike

Well over the Labor Day weekend, I finished up a Destination Florida Update.

There are two new Sign Sections:

First, Florida Colored US Shields. The feeling and goal is that this will turn into a VA Cutouts or PA Keystone type collection page. And it looks like the Law of Updates is in effect as I got an e-mail from Jim Teresco to use his photos. (Note: The Law of Updates is that within 48 hours of an update, I'll receive photos from a contributor on the state or subject I updated on. This happens most of the time when I introduce a new state or feature.)

Second, Disney Signage. I wasn't sure what I wanted to do with this. So I asked a few folks, and their answer was "Sure, Why Not." Well at least they know the blog site. :-p

Finally, Sign Gallery. The usual lot of photos from JP Natsiatka. It is soon becoming his own personal gallery!

So what is next:

Well right now I am working on South Carolina. The update will consist of the usual sign gallery additions (Doug Kerr is now relevant in SC!) I-73 and the Carolina Bays Parkway news and information updates (along with photos), and also with the help of a few others I'm able to make the Cooper River Bridges photos into a feature page. (It's up already if you've stopped by).

North Carolina: This is gonna take a while. A plethora of ends, Doug basically sent me a photo of every mile of US 17 in NC (from his drive back to NY from Brian's Wedding) so the Ocean Highway Page may see a heavy update, I have features of the Sunset Beach Pontoon Bridge and the Elwell Ferry over the Cape Fear River, I'm gonna trace the original Independence Blvd. with the help of Chris Curley, Carolina Lost will see some old billboards, weigh stations, and other stuff. Just got some I-485 construction photos from Lyndon Young. Of course sign gallery stuff, and I am sure I forgot a thing or two.

Virginia: Cutouts and signs. I'll expand the Lee Highway to New Market. Plus, a few features on a pair of inland ferries. Maybe a small town of Virginia series tied into one of them also.

West Virginia: Ends and Corridor H

PA: Kinzua Dam, some covered bridges as i start to work through my digital images from last year, A ton of old PA Turnpike Postcards for Bill Symons, some more Keystones. And of course sign photos. Of course I am certain this list will expand in the upcoming months.

Georgia: John Krakoff is sending me a cd-rom full of Douglass County goodies, which I should get this week.

One last thing, the last PA update I really enjoyed and specifically the Fred Yenerall Collection. It is a great honor to host and showcase those photos for his family, and I hope you have enjoyed them as much as I have.

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