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The Blue Ridge Parkway

For over 60 years, the Blue Ridge Parkway has combined modern travel with the splendid of nature.  Unlike the thousands of miles of superhighways that grace this nation, the 469 mile parkway purposely avoids altering the landscape allowing visitors to enjoy the majestic beauty of the Blue Ridge in North Carolina and Virginia.  Linking two popular national parks, Shenandoah and Great Smokey Mountains, the route goes from foothills and farmlands to heights of over 5000 feet.  No matter how high or low the elevation, the Parkway is full of endless and spectacular views, hiking trails, and an infinite number of natural possibilities.

In 2003, I began a Blue Ridge Parkway travelogue on my old All Things NC! website.  When we shutdown Gribblenation in 2016, I began to transfer the old pages to the blog as well as adding new stops along the way.  This gateway page will continue to be updated as new stops are added from future excursions on this wonderful road.

Site Navigation: 
Virginia: 
North Carolina:
Just off the Parkway:
Parkway Related Roadtrips:
Learn more about the roadtrips behind the features
For all photo or story inquiries - or if you have information to share - please feel free to comment or reach me directly at aprince27@gmail.com.

Blue Ridge Parkway shield courtesy of Bruce Cridlebaugh.
   
 
 

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