Skip to main content

Arizona State Route 74


Arizona State Route 74 is a 30.40-mile State Highway located in northern Maricopa County.  Arizona State Route 74 begins at US Route 60 near Morristown and terminates in the city of Phoenix at Interstate 17.   Arizona State Route 74 is aligned over Morristown-New River Highway, Lake Pleasant Parkway and Carefree Highway.  The current Arizona State Route 74 is the second iteration of the highway and was defined in 1962.  Arizona State Route 74 by 1974 had a temporary terminus at Lake Pleasant Road and Carefree Highway.  A temporary alignment of Arizona State Route 74 initially carried the highway to Interstate 17 via Carefree Highway until being made permanent during 1989.  Future planning documents has Arizona State Route 74 being realigned onto the Lake Pleasant Freeway and New River Freeway.  




Part 1; the history of Arizona State Route 74

The original Arizona State Route 74 was designed during 1927 as part of the original run of Arizona State Highways.  Arizona State Route 74 was known as the "Sunkist Highway" and originated at US Route 89 in Wickenburg.  Arizona State Route 74 had a western terminus located at the Colorado River Bridge and California state line near Ehrenburg.  

The original Arizona State Route 74 can be seen on the 1931 Clason's Road Map of Arizona.

US Route 60 would rapidly be extended after the US Route System was created and would come into play in Arizona and California during the early 1930s. A letter from the American Association of State Highways Officials (AASHO) Executive Secretary to the California State Highway Engineer dated Marth 30, 1931 noted that US Route 60 had been tentatively approved to be extended to California during the AASHO Executive Committee on May 26, 1930. The approval of US Route 60 being extended to California carried the stipulation that the Colorado River Bridge in Blythe be purchased by the California Division of Highways and Arizona State Road Department. The letter noted California and Arizona had taken steps through their respective legislatures to purchase the Colorado River Bridge.

A letter from the California State Highway Engineer to the AASHO Executive Secretary on April 13, 1931, noted legislation to purchase the Colorado River Bridge had been passed in California. The purchase of the Colorado River Bridge effectively made the extension of US Route 60 into California via Arizona active. US Route 60 had been extended from Amarillo, Texas and absorbed the entirety of the Sunkist Highway west of Wickenburg.

US Route 60 and Arizona State Route 74 seemingly for a time were co-signed on the Sunkist Highway.  Both highways appear signed on the Sunkist Highway on the 1933 Midwest Map of Arizona.  US Route 70 would be extended into California during 1934 and multiplexed US Route 60 on the Sunkist Highway.  Following US Route 70 being extended into California the original Arizona State Route 74 appears to have been deleted.  

The current Arizona State Route 74 was defined during 1962.  Arizona State Route 74 was planned with an alignment originating at US Route 60-70-89 in Morristown east to Interstate 17 in New River. 


Arizona State Route 74 was originally intended to branch northeast from Lake Pleasant to New River.  Arizona State Route 74 was completed from US Route 60-89 east of Morristown to Lake Pleasant by 1974.  Arizona State Route 74 had an interim terminus located at the intersection of Lake Pleasant Road and Carefree Highway.  Carefree Highway east to Interstate 17 was designated as Temporary Arizona State Route 74 to provide routing continuity.  


The temporary terminus of Arizona State Route 74 at Lake Pleasant Road and Carefree Highway appears on the 1988 United States Geological Survey Map of North Phoenix.  


The alignment of Arizona State Route 74 east of Lake Pleasant along Carefree Highway to Interstate 17 was made permanent during 1989.  


Arizona State Route 74 is tentatively planned to be gradually upgraded to freeway standards (the Lake Pleasant Freeway and New River Freeway) and extended to Interstate 11.  Improvements to Arizona State Route 74 are not anticipated to begin until after 2025.  The planned freeway corridor of Arizona State Route 74 appears on a 2009 Maricopa Association of Governments Map.  The freeway corridor of Arizona State Route 74 has it extending to New River as originally planned in 1962.  




Part 2; a drive on Arizona State Route 74

Eastbound Arizona State Route 74 begins at US Route 60 near Morristown. 



Eastbound Arizona State Route 74 begins on Morristown-New River Highway.  Arizona State Route 74 is co-signed initially with "TO Interstate 17" shields.  Arizona State Route 74 is signed as 22 miles from Lake Pleasant and 30 miles from Interstate 17.  



Arizona State Route 74 eastbound skirts the edge of Morristown and intersects Castle Hot Springs Road.  


Arizona State Route 74 eastbound follows Morristown-New River Highway into the northern limits of the city of Peoria.  Arizona State Route 74 eastbound crosses the Agua Fria River and transitions onto the Lake Pleasant Parkway.  

















Arizona State Route 74 east of the Agua Fria River is signed as 10 miles from Interstate 17.  


Arizona State Route 74 eastbound approaches a junction with southbound Lake Pleasant Parkway and transitions onto Carefree Highway.  The intersection of Arizona State Route 74 and 87th Avenue sometimes appears on maps as "Unfinished Arizona State Route 74."







Arizona State Route 74 eastbound enters the city of Phoenix and follows Carefree Highway to a terminus at Interstate 17.  Carefree Highway extends east of Interstate 17 to Scottsdale Road to the community of Carefree.  






Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Old River Lock & Control Structure (Lettsworth, LA)

  The Old River Control Structure (ORCS) and its connecting satellite facilities combine to form one of the most impressive flood control complexes in North America. Located along the west bank of the Mississippi River near the confluence with the Red River and Atchafalaya River nearby, this structure system was fundamentally made possible by the Flood Control Act of 1928 that was passed by the United States Congress in the aftermath of the Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 however a second, less obvious motivation influenced the construction here. The Mississippi River’s channel has gradually elongated and meandered in the area over the centuries, creating new oxbows and sandbars that made navigation of the river challenging and time-consuming through the steamboat era of the 1800s. This treacherous area of the river known as “Turnbull’s Bend” was where the mouth of the Red River was located that the upriver end of the bend and the Atchafalaya River, then effectively an outflow

Huey P. Long Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

The decade of the 1930s brought unprecedented growth and development to Louisiana’s transportation infrastructure as the cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge cemented their place as leading urban centers on the Gulf Coast. In the immediate aftermath of the success garnered by the construction of the massive bridge on the Mississippi River near New Orleans in 1935, planning and construction commenced on the state’s second bridge over the great river. This new bridge, located on the north side of Baton Rouge, was to be similar in design and form to its downriver predecessor. Completed in 1940 as the second bridge across the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the first to be built in the Baton Rouge area, this bridge is one of two bridges on the Mississippi named for Huey P. Long, a Louisiana politician who served as the 40th Governor of the State from 1928 to 1932, then as U.S. Senator from 1932 until his death by assassination at the state capitol in Baton Rouge on September 10, 1935