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The National Road - Pennsylvania - Brownsville to Washington


The National Road travels through the heart of Centerville. (Adam Prince)
As you exit Brownsville and continue further west, the next town along the National Road is Centerville.  The heart of this small town is located along the original routing of the National Road located just north of modern US 40.  The town, which was founded in 1821, was a central stopping point for stagecoaches between Uniontown and Washington.  Because of its location between the two cities, Centerville was a very prominent location in the early days of the National Road.  Because of its location there are several historic former inn and taverns within or just outside of the town's limits. 

The former Riggle Tavern in Centerville.  (John Grable)
One of these historic former tavern's is Riggle Tavern located just west of Centerville.  The tavern was owned by Zaphania Riggle, who would own numerous taverns along the pike in Washington County.  The tavern that bears his last name was burned under his ownership; however, it was immediately rebuilt.  Mr. Riggle transferred ownership of the tavern in 1845 to Peter Colley. (1)

The former Stephen Hill's Tavern, now Century Inn, located in Scenery Hill. (The Bee Family)
Further west, you will come across Hill's Tavern.  The building, which was constructed in 1794, is located in Scenery Hill.  The Village of Scenery Hill is definitely worth a stop while traveling the National Road.  Scenery Hill is a popular tourist destination and is home of many quaint restaurants and antique shops.  Hill's Tavern is now named 'The Century Inn.'  The Inn can lodge up to 19 guests and also can dine and entertain up to 150 patrons in five separate dining rooms.  Across the street is 'Zephanie Riggle's House of Entertainment.'  The intriguingly named inn can also lodge up to nine guests.  Tragically, in August of 2015, a devastating fire heavily damaged the Century Inn.  Fortunately, the fire occurred on a Monday night when the inn and restaurant is closed.   In April of 2017, it was announced that reconstruction of the Century Inn was underway and that they hope to reopen the inn and restaurant in the fall of 2017.

The Century Inn also is home to a rare framed flag of the Whiskey Rebellion.  The Rebellion was a Southwestern Pennsylvanian farmers revolt on a federal excise tax on liquor.  It was quickly dissolved by President Washington without any fighting.  Fortunately, the flag was saved during the August 2015 fire.  The flag is the only known surviving flag from the Whiskey Rebellion. 


The Flag of the Whiskey Rebellion.  (Mike Austing)


Site Navigation:
Sources & Links:
  • Mike Austing
  • The Bee Family
  • John Grable
  • (1) Grable, John, "Additions to web page." Personal e-mail. May 2, 2005.
  • The Century Inn

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