Skip to main content

Route 75 Tunnel - Ironton, Ohio


In the Ohio River community of Ironton, Ohio, there is a former road tunnel that has a haunted legend to it. This tunnel was formerly numbered OH 75 (hence the name Route 75 Tunnel), which was renumbered as OH 93 due to I-75 being built in the state. Built in 1866, it is 165 feet long and once served as the northern entrance into Ironton, originally for horses and buggies and later for cars. As the tunnel predated the motor vehicle era, it was too narrow for cars to be traveling in both directions. But once US 52 was built in the area, OH 93 was realigned to go around the tunnel instead of through the tunnel, so the tunnel was closed to traffic in 1960.

The legend of the haunted tunnel states that since there were so many accidents that took place inside the tunnel's narrow walls, the tunnel was cursed. The haunted legend states that there was an accident between a tanker truck and a school bus coming home after a high school football game on a cold, foggy Halloween night in 1959. The school bus driver did not honk his horn or flash his lights going into the tunnel, so he did not see the tanker truck. Then, disaster struck. It is said that it took days for the fire to be extinguished from the tunnel and screams could be heard for miles.

Whether it was due to disaster or just the modernization of our highway system, the tunnel was closed to traffic after that. It remained unused for decades, maybe used as storage or somesuch. However, it is now opened by the Ironton Lions Club to curiosity seekers as a haunted attraction around Halloween time, in order to help tell the spooky tales surrounding the legend of the haunted Route 75 Tunnel.



A brief history of the tunnel.


Looking inside the tunnel. It's become a haunted local attraction.

Looking towards downtown Ironton and across the Ohio River into Kentucky.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Route 75 Tunnel - Lawrence County Register
State Route 75 Tunnel - Bridgehunter.com
Haunted Tunnel legend remains scary tale - Ironton Tribune
Ironton The Hidden Tunnel - YouTube
Photos of Ironton, Ohio Tunnel and SR 93 - Lawrence County Register

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Signed County Route J37; the last Signed Tulare County Route and the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road

Recently I drove the entirety of Signed County Route J37 located in rural Tulare County.  Signed County Route J37 is notable in that it is the last Signed County Route which actually has field signage left in Tulare County and was intended to be part of a Trans-Sierra Highway known as the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road.


While researching California State Route 190 and more specifically the gap in the highway over the Sierra Nevada Range it became quickly apparent that there was far more to J37/Balch Park Road than initially thought.  The previous blog on California State Route 190 can be found here:

California State Route 190; the Trans-Sierra Highway that could have been 

On the above blog I attached an article from 1926 written by the Los Angeles Times detailing the route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road which was slated to begin construction in 1927.  The route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road would have followed Carroll Creek southward out…

Paper Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains; CA 48 (ii), CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249

In this edition Paper Highways the planned California State Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains are explored.  This issue will cover the planned routes of; the second CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249.



Part 1; the wholesale Legislative Route adoptions of 1959

CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249 prior to the 1964 State Highway Renumbering all were adopted as planned Legislative Routes ("LRN") in 1959.  Part of the planned LRN 267 west of Lancaster was already part of the existing CA 138 on LRN 59.  CA 48 east of Lancaster was planned as LRN 267 which was to have an eastern terminus at LRN 266.  LRN 266 was planned to originate from CA 2/LRN 61 near La Canada Flintridge and cross north/northeast over the San Gabriel Mountains into the Mojave Desert near Palmdale.  LRN 266 was planned to continue northeast from Palmdale to former US 466/LRN 48 near Hawes.  LRN 266 became CA 249 and CA 122 during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  LRN 269 was planned to be rou…

Old California State Route 65 on; Famoso-Porterville Highway, Sign County Routes J35/J22/J29

Earlier in March I traveled down to Famoso of Kern County to take the original alignment of California State Route 65 north to Lindsay in Tulare County.


This blog is a spin off of the below entry on the Southern Segment of current California State Route 65.

California State Route 65; South Segment

Part 1; The Stockton-Los Angeles Road, the East Side Line, and early California State Route 65 on Legislative Route 129

The corridor of CA 65 is closely aligned to the Sierra Nevada Foothills which first became a popular route of travel as part of the Stockton-Los Angeles Road.  The Stockton-Los Angeles Road came into use after the 1853 Kern River Gold Rush began.  The Stockton-Los Angeles Road was a replacement of the earlier El Camino Viejo.  Unlike El Camino Viejo the Stockton-Los Angeles Road avoided the dense Tule Marshes in San Joaquin Valley.  The Stockton-Los Angles Road stayed close to the Sierra Foothills near the new claims on the Kern River watershed.  The earlier El Camino Vi…