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Virginia group appeals I-73 decision

In what may be another setback for Interstate 73 in Virginia, Virginians for Appropriate Roads (VAR) has filed an appeal of an August decision by U.S. District Court Judge James C. Turk. The motion was filed to the US 4th Circuit Court of Appeals.

VAR, who has been fighting I-73 since 1994, originally sued claiming that the Virginia Department of Transportation did not adequately consider safety improvements to the existing US 220. In their opinion, making improvements to US 220 is the best possible solution.

VDOT has argued that when Congress legislated the construction of I-73 in 1991 that it was Congress' intent that a new alignment for I-73 would be the best means for safer and faster transportation in the area. They also argue that upgrading US 220 would not make the needed transportation improvements that a new I-73 would.

Turk's decision stated that VDOT did all that was necessary required by Federal Law in studying the route.

Ann Rogers, who is a spokeswoman for VAR, concedes that even if they win the case the court would require VDOT to further study US 220, and even then VDOT can state that the best possible choice is to build a new alignment for I-73.

The 4th Circuit Court has yet to schedule a hearing date.

Story Link:

Group appeals I-73 path ruling ---Myrtle Beach Sun News

Comments

Anonymous said…
VAR has already lost the appeal once.. why does they have to appeal again? US 220 is not safe to drive on, especially with so many businesses and all that on sides. VAR needs to learn to accept their loss and let it go.

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