Skip to main content

Texas Vacation - San Antonio

The last full day in Texas was spent in San Antonio. Out first stop was Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery where Maggie's grandfather is buried. It's amazing how tranquil a location it is amidst all the base activity that surrounds it. Over 120,000 lay in eternal rest there. It is an extremely powerful site.

For the entire set from San Antonio (nearly 100 photos), go here.

From there it was into downtown San Antonio. We arrived just prior to 11, so we were unable to check in though we did leave our car at the hotel. Obviously, the first stop in San Antonio is always The Alamo. It is correct that the building itself isn't as massive as you'd think, but take the time to walk the grounds and taken in the exhibits and you'll really begin to understand how the siege and battle at The Alamo is the powerful symbol for all of Texas as it still is today.

The Alamo

To first time visitor's, the smaller skyline of San Antonio maybe come as a surprise. But when you take a closer look, the skyscrapers San Antonio does have are impressive and complete with character from years gone by.

IMG_1302

IMG_1320

IMG_1329

We walked a bit in and around town and started to get hungry, so we headed down to the Riverwalk and ate lunch at The County Line BBQ. I definitely recommend it. The sauce was excellent...plus you can't go wrong with eating along the Riverwalk.

Finally, we were able to check into our hotel - the Drury Plaza Inn. The hotel is located in the former Alamo National Bank Building. The 24 story Renaissance style building was built in 1913 - and the Drury maintains a lot of the charm of this historical building.

The lobby is impressive - and a lot of the old bank features are incorporated into the hotel. For example old teller windows are part of the reservation desk.

IMG_1297

IMG_1292

IMG_1295

Our room was on the 17th floor and was very nice. You certainly had the feeling in the hallway you were in an old office building - but that added to the charm. Insie, the accomidations were well kept and I couldn't complain about the views of the outside.

The best part of the hotel had to be the relaxing views of San Antonio from the outdoor rooftop pool on the 23rd floor. And on a 90 plus degree day, it certainly was welcomed!

IMG_1363

IMG_1366

Next up was a cruise of the Riverwalk - and for $8 it was worth it. The cruise lasts about 45 minutes and if it's your first time there, like it was for us, the cruise really shows you a lot of the Riverwalk and some of the history behind it.

IMG_1375

IMG_1377

Margaritas, anyone?

From there it was dinner. One of the amazing thing's about the Riverwalk - besides the atmosphere - is how all of the various restaurants really try to sell you on their place. Unfortunately, you may not always get what you expected - and where we went for Tex-Mex was an example of that. Sadly, the Rio Rio Cantina seemed like a great place for dinner - but the service and the food didn't meet the hype.

However, it didn't damper a wonderful time in San Antonio. A city that you can instantly fall in love with. We didn't see everything there is to see in one day - but it was just enough to make you want to go back. And that we will!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California

The historic corridor of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 through the borderlands of southern California share a largely mutual history.  Both highways originated in the city of San Diego and departed the state at the Colorado River into Yuma, Arizona.  Both highways share numerous famous geographical components such as the Mountain Springs Grade and Algodones Sand Dunes.  This article serves as a comprehensive history of the combined US Route 80/Interstate 8 corridor in California from the tolled stage route era of the nineteenth century to the development of the modern freeway.   The blog cover photo features US Route 80 along the Mountains Springs Grade through In-Ko-Pah Gorge during late 1920s.  This photo is part of the Caltrans McCurry Collection. Part 1; the history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California share a largely mutual history.  The backstory of both highways is tied heavily to the corridors of the Old Spanish Trail, Legisl

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact, the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine w