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Interstate 90 at the Appalachian Trail


One thing that I like to do is combine my road trips with hikes. Sometimes, I get the chance to blend the two interests together, whether it be a hike down an abandoned stretch of road, or even taking a hiking trail to get an unique view of a road from a different angle. Recently, I took a short hike on the Appalachian Trail in the Berkshires of Massachusetts, specifically from US 20 to I-90 in Becket, Massachusetts. The goal was to see the Massachusetts Turnpike from a different perspective after driving through Western Massachusetts for so many years. This was something that I had long wanted to do and decided to finally do it during a drive around the Berkshires.

It's not a far walk to get from the pull-off on US 20, just about a half mile. However, you do have to walk a little bit east from the pull-off to the stairs that will take you along the way. Then it's a short walk through some woods and a small stream to Greenwater Pond. From the pond, it's a quick shot over to the Mass Pike. Let's take a brief tour.


Actually hiking the Appalachian Trail, if only for a bit.

Greenwater Pond. There was a passing rainstorm coming in behind me, so the sky is looking pretty dark.

We've arrived at the Massachusetts Turnpike. Currently looking towards the west at the westbound lanes.

The Appalachian Trail starts a loop under the overpass and then eventually up a slope to cross the highway.


Sign denoting that this is the Appalachian Trail crossing in Becket, Massachusetts. We're currently 14.7 miles away from the border with New York State.

There is a break in the fence between the trail and the Mass Pike. My guess the break in the fence is for emergency purposes in case someone got injured while hiking and not as an escape option for through hikers who have had enough hiking and want to bum a ride to Albany.

Walking up to the overpass over the eastbound lanes. I didn't spend much time here as the rain was coming down pretty heavily at that point and I had neglected to bring my rain poncho.

Looking east at the eastbound lanes of the Mass Pike.
Starting to walk over the westbound overpass.

Getting welcomed to the Berkshires on the Mass Pike westbound.

Heading back to my car now that the rain is winding down. There's an earthen dam here at Greenwater Pond.



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