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Duluth's Lakewalk

Back in August 2006, I visited Duluth, Minnesota on a work trip.  I blogged about it, but I never created any features or really shared the photos from it.  The next series of posts will make up for it.

The Duluth Lakewalk approaching the Aerial Lift Bridge

The first feature is the Duluth Lakewalk.  This seven and a half mile multi-use recreational trail along the shores of Lake Superior is one of Duluth's top attractions.  I stayed along the shores of Lake Superior and the Lakewalk for two nights.  The afternoon of the first day - we had some free time to ourselves so I spent time along the trail.  The time spent along the Lakewalk that afternoon started out overcast but cleared up by the time we would all meet for dinner.


The Duluth Lakewalk connects to and showcases various parts of the city.  Below: As the skies began to clear, Lake Superior's scenic coastline came to life.


The trail starts at the Aerial Lift Bridge and ends at University Park in the Lakeside - Lester Park Neighborhood.   It connects to some of the city's major parks - Leif Erikson and Sister Cities - and some major attractions - The Lake Superior Marine Museum, the Northland Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and the Duluth Rose Garden.  

The Northland Vietnam Veterans Memorial is located along the Duluth Lakewalk

Lake Place and Sister Cities Parks are accessible via the Duluth Lakewalk and offer unique views of the city.


Along Lake Superior - the Lakewalk consists of a boardwalk for walking/running and a paved dual bike lane.  The Lakewalk was first constructed in 1986 covering only a half mile.  Numerous additions has resulted in the 7.5 mile total length existing today.

By the end of the day, the clearing skies made it easier to capture the North and South Pier Lights.

The next morning - I decided to get up early and catch the sunrise over Lake Superior.  The Lakewalk also connects to the Duluth North Pier Lighthouse which I wanted to capture at sunrise.  It was well worth the 5:00 am wake up call!

Sunrise over Lake Superior and a lost ore boat.
The Duluth North Pier Lighthouse

The Duluth South Pier Lighthouse

All photos taken by post author - August 2006.

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