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The National Road - Ohio - Cambridge

The historic Guernsey County Courthouse (Doug Kerr)
US 40 continues west into the City of Cambridge.  Cambridge serves as the county seat of Gurnsey County and is well known for manufacturing glassware.  Cambridge's origins date to the late 18th and early 19th Centuries.  Col. Ebenezer Zane, while constructing the frontier road known as Zane's Trace towards Kentucky, established a ferry over Willis Creek.  By 1806, the town was platted and named Cambridge.  Just east of Downtown Cambridge, US 40 is joined with US 22 which enters town from the Northeast.  Together, US 22 and US 40 serves as the Main Street through Downtown Cambridge.
Downtown Cambridge (Doug Kerr)
Cambridge is well known for glassware and the work of the former Cambridge Glass Company.   The Cambridge Glass company would begin production at the start of the 20th century.  The company would operate in Cambridge until 1954 and was sold soon after.  Production at the plant would continue until 1958, when the new owners Morrison Industries ceased operations at the site. (1) The National Cambridge Collectors, Inc. hosts a museum within the city that is dedicated to the preservation of Cambridge Glass. 
Downtown Cambridge (Doug Kerr)
During the Christmas holiday season, Cambridge hosts the Dickens Victorian Village.  The shops of Cambridge's Main Street transform into an old English village from the author Charles Dickens' era.  The historic Guernsey County Courthouse becomes the focal point of a spectacular nightly holiday light show. The Village runs annually from November 1st through New Years with numerous events and activities throughout the two month celebration.

Cambridge is the birthplace of American hero, John Glenn.  Glenn, who was the first American astronaut to orbit the earth and would later serve as a United States Senator, would also go on to attend at nearby Muskingum College in nearby New Concord.
Downtown Cambridge (Doug Kerr)

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