Skip to main content

Cannery Row Monterey

On my way back from CA 68 and Asilomar Beach I made my way to Cannery Row for old times sake.  Cannery Row was part of what was one of biggest trips my family took in all the way back in 1993 when we were residing in Connecticut.  The 1993 trip started in San Francisco and ended in San Diego, most of it was taken along California State Route 1.  Cannery Row in Monterey was part of the 1993 vacation  due to it being a name tourist destination and location of the Monterey Bay Aquarium which had opened in 1984.  I thought it would be interesting to take some comparison pictures which honestly really didn't look much different despite the passage of time.

Cannery Row was part of the original alignment of 17 Mile Drive back in 1901.  I'm not all that familiar with the backstory of the Cannery but it appears to have been split off at least by the early 1920s since the sardine canning industry appears to have begun as early as 1902.  Cannery Row actually has a website and has some good historical references that go into much more detail than I can:

Cannery Row History

The canning industry appears to have gone defunct by 1973 and Cannery Row became more of a tourist destination.   Pretty much Cannery Row has kept the historic motif which really has been helped by the Monterey Bay Aquarium drawing tourist interest.








As for that family trip, after Monterey we made our way south on CA 1 through Big Sur.  I really wish that I had more photos from that trip of Big Sur but it was the age of having to take your film to the photo booth or using a Polaroid which didn't really lend to having anything in volume.  Really it was my first experience on the West Coast and sure was an eye opener having lived only in Michigan and Connecticut up to that point.  I pretty much knew even then as a kid that I wanted to be on the West Coast and made good on it back in the early 2000s moving across the country the week after I graduate high school.  Weird to see that Cannery Row looks exactly as how I remembered it even after a quarter century, even stranger that I never thought to go revisit despite being in Monterey as often as I am.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Dummy Lights of New York

  A relic of the early days of motoring, dummy lights were traffic lights  that  were  placed  in the middle of a street intersection. In those early days, traffic shuffled through busy intersections with the help of a police officer who stood on top of a pedestal. As technology improved and electric traffic signals became commonplace, they were also  originally  positioned on a platform at the center of the intersection. Those traffic signals became known as  " dummy lights "  and were common until  traffic lights were moved  onto wires and poles that crossed above the intersection.  In New York State, only a handful of these dummy lights exist. The dummy lights  are found  in the Hudson Valley towns of Beacon and Croton-on-Hudson, plus there is an ongoing tug of war in Canajoharie in the Mohawk Valley, where their dummy light has been knocked down and replaced a few times. The dummy light in Canajoharie is currently out of commission, but popular demand has caused the dummy

Colorado Road (Fresno County)

Colorado Road is a rural highway located in San Joaquin Valley of western Fresno County.  Colorado Road services the city of San Joaquin in addition the unincorporated communities of Helm and Tranquility.  Colorado Road was constructed between 1910 and 1912 as a frontage road of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The roadway begins at California State Route 145 near Helm and terminates to the west at James Road in Tranquility.   Part 1; the history of Colorado Road Colorado Road was constructed as frontage road connecting the sidings of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway spanned from South Pacific Railroad West Side Line at Ingle junction southeast to the Coalinga Branch at Armona.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway broke ground during August 1910 and was complete by April 1912. The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway established numerous new sidings.  From Ingle the sidings of the line were Tranquility, Graham, San Joaquin, Caldwell, H

Madera County Road 400 and the 1882-1886 Yosemite Stage Road

Madera County Road 400 is an approximately twenty-four-mile roadway following the course of the Fresno River in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.  Road 400 begins at California State Route 145 near Madera and terminates to the north at Road 415 near Coarsegold.  Traditionally Road 400 was known as "River Road" prior to Madera County dropping naming conventions on county highways.  Road 400 was part of the original Yosemite Stage Route by the Washburn Brothers which began in 1882.  The Yosemite Stage Route would be realigned to the west in 1886 along what is now Road 600 to a rail terminus in Raymond.  Parts of Road 400 were realigned in 1974 to make way for the Hensley Lake Reservoir.  Part 1; the history of Madera County Road 400 Road 400 is historically tied to the Wawona Road and Hotel.  The Wawona Hotel is located near the Mariposa Grove in the modern southern extent of Yosemite National Park.   The origins of the Wawona Road are tied to the Wawona Hotel but it does predate th