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Cross Country Roadtrip - Day 5 Part 2 - Albuquerque to Midland, TX

This post covers the trip from Albuquerque to Midland, Texas via Alamogordo, New Mexico.  White Sands National Monument has already been covered - some of the photos are from the trip to White Sands and the others are obviously after.  :-p

The route: I-40, I-25, US 380, US 54, US 70, White Sands National Monument, US 70, US 82, NM 529, US 62/US 180, US 385, TX 158, TX 191, TX Loop 250, Business I-20.

The entire 79 photo set from the trip is up on flickr.

Over at the aaroads blog, Jake mentioned that New Mexico has begun to use a more classic US shield style on their guide signs.  His examples are on I-40 Eastbound in Santa Rosa.  Well on I-25 South in Bernardo a similar style is for US 60 (Exit 175).  The US 60 shield has a 'US' within the shield above the number.  Unfortunately, I was checking something on my phone when we passed it, and didn't get a picture.

However, in Socorro, there is a guide for Business Loop I-25 and US 60 with an odd font.

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And when did US 60 change to North/South??

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Now US 60 does run North/South through Socorro - but only for a mile or so.

Next up, US 380 east from San Antonio to Carrizozo.  Once the sun angle improved, it was quite an enjoyable - yet isolated - drive.

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US 70 near Holloman Air Force Base has some nice overhead guides:

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In Alamogordo, on the old route through town there were still US 82 shields with US 54 and 70.

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Then it was onto US 82 East and the climb into the Sacramento Mountains and Lincoln National Forest.  If you ever want a scenic alternative from I-25 to I-20 and not go through El Paso.  US 82 is the way to go.

Sacramento Mountains

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There's even a tunnel!

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On the east side of the Sacramento Mountains the views are just as photo worthy.

Otero County View

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The twists and turns of US 82

East of Artesia - You'll find plenty of these:

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And the journey home really began when we passed this sign.

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A few more miles and turns later we pulled into Midland for the night.

One last post left, Day 6 & 7 Midland to North Carolina with an overnight stop in Tuscaloosa.

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