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FHWA approves next segment of I-69 extension in Indiana

The Federal Highway Administration gave the green light for construction of another segment of the I-69 extension between Indianapolis and Evansville. The section approved stretches from US-50 just east of Washington to US-231 outside of the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center in Greene County. Bids for overpasses to be built should be let within the next week, with work to begin on them within two months. Paving should start this summer.

The INDOT spokeswoman quoted in the Indianapolis Star article mentions that the third of six segments should receive federal approval this spring. This would most likely be the segment from SR 64 north to US-50, as the segments north of Crane are as of now not funded.

More info on the project as a whole can be found on the Build I-69 website. Although its focus is on Indiana, it occasionally brings to light the progress of I-69 in other states, as the route will eventually stretch south to Laredo, TX.

Oh, for those of you who were wondering, I’m a new writer to this blog. Adam invited me to the roster after a commenter brought up a project in my home state of Michigan, and of course I had to say “Sure, Why Not!?” As you can see, I also try to keep up on road issues in surrounding states and much of the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions. Michigan itself faces a lot of issues, and it helps to have a Michigander’s perspective on these things. I’ll post on the issues that I feel are important as well as offer occasional trip reports. This should be a lot of fun.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hey, looking forward to your future posts! I too am from Michigan and i've been following projects around the area, including I-69 through Indiana. And kudos to everyone at the blog, the information is great!
~Matt

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