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I-40 in Western NC re-opening pushed back a month

The miserable weather this past winter has pushed back the re-opening of Interstate 40 in Western North Carolina back a month to late April.  Hopefully, the weather over the next two months will cooperate and there will be no further delays.

For more:
I-40 opening delayed to April ---Asheville Citizen-Times

Comments

John said…
What with the terrible weather, concerns over safety at the rockslide, and addition of extra locations to work on, I feel that NCDOT and their contractors have done a remarkable job in getting this work done in a reasonable amount of time.

Rockslides are extremely unpredictable to determine the time they will take to fix until engineers and geologists can inspect the site; no one could do that for weeks until the slope was stabilized and the rocks cleared away. A month's delay is negligible compared to the lives of the men working to stabilize those locations; the extra month is time well spent IMO.

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