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Santa Ana Street, Anaheim, California


Santa Ana Street in the city of Anaheim features s street-running line of the Union Pacific Railroad.  The Union Pacific Railroad joins Santa Ana Street at West Street and runs east in the center turn lane towards Olive Street.  The line occupying Santa Ana Street was placed by the Southern Pacific Railroad originally as a spur in 1899.  




Part 1; the history of the street running rails of Santa Ana Street

Anaheim was founded in what was then southern Los Angeles County during 1857.  The location of Anaheim selected due to it being near fertile agricultural lands.  Anaheim was plotted around what is now South Street, West Street, North Street and East Street.  Anaheim would incorporate as a city on March 18, 1876.  

During 1873 the Southern Pacific Railroad would begin constructing a spur line from Los Angeles to Anaheim.  The Los Angeles-Anaheim line was completed during 1874 and scheduled service began during January 1875.  The Southern Pacific Railroad spur would be extended from Anaheim to Santa Ana during late year 1877.  The Southern Pacific Railroad in Anaheim ran alongside what would be called Anaheim-Telegraph Road (which later began US Route 101 Bypass).  

The Southern Pacific Railroad through Anaheim can be seen on the 1882 Bancroft's Map of California.  The Anaheim spur branched from the Los Angeles-San Pedro mainline of the Southern Pacific Railroad at Florence (now part of Los Angeles).


In 1887 the Los Angeles & San Diego Branch of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway (ATSF) was constructed through Anaheim.  The ATSF line passed through the eastern limits of Anaheim between Los Angeles Street (now Anaheim Boulevard) and East Street.  The ATSF line was located much closer to downtown Anaheim than the Southern Pacific Railroad spur.  

During 1888 the Southern Pacific Railroad began construction of a spur line south of Anaheim at Miraflores siding.  This spur line would be routed through the communities of Olive, Villa Park, McPherson, El Modena and Tustin.  Orange County would split from Los Angeles County during April 1889. 

The ATSF and Southern Pacific Railroad lines through Anaheim can be seen on the 1896 United States Geological Survey Map of Anaheim.  The branching line of the Southern Pacific Railroad towards Tustin can be seen originating at Miraflores siding. 


During 1899 the Southern Pacific Railroad would construct an additional spur line through downtown Anaheim to better compete with the ATSF.  This spur of the Southern Pacific Railroad diverged from the mainline at West Street near Loara siding and followed Santa Ana Street east into downtown Anaheim.  The spur turned south following Olive Street towards Tustin Junction where all three Southern Pacific Railroad lines in the Anaheim area met.  

The Southern Pacific Railroad spur following Santa Ana Street in Anaheim can be seen for the first time on the 1901 United States Geological Survey Map of Anaheim.  


During the late 1930s the original Southern Pacific Railroad line from Santa Ana Street in Anaheim south to Katella Avenue was removed to make way for extension of Manchester Boulevard.  The main flow of Southern Pacific Railroad traffic was rerouted onto the 1899 spur which ran along Santa Ana Street and Olive Street in Anaheim towards Tustin.  

The May 1937 California Highways & Public Works discusses the opening the final segment of the "Manchester Boulevard Extension" which was dedicated on April 3h, 1937.  The Manchester Boulevard Extension provided a direct link between Downey and Anaheim which followed the Southern Pacific Railroad.  The Manchester Boulevard Extension bypassed downtown Anaheim and tied into existing alignment of California State Route 10 (Legislative Route Number 174) on southern Manchester Boulevard at Miraflores near the outskirts of Santa Ana.  The Manchester Boulevard Extension is stated to have been conceptualized during 1924 by the Greater Manchester Avenue Improvement Association.  The Manchester Boulevard Extension concept was taken over by the Division of Highways when Legislative Route Number 174 was added as a State Highway circa 1933.  Manchester Boulevard in Anaheim would appear as part of US Route 101 Bypass on the 1940 Division of Highways Map and would become part of mainline US Route 101 in 1953.  




The mainline of the Southern Pacific Railroad being rerouted to Santa Ana Street and Olive Street in Anaheim can be seen on the 1950 United States Geological Survey Map of Anaheim.  


Part 2; a drive along Santa Ana Street

During 1996 the Southern Pacific Railroad was merged into the Union Pacific Railroad.  The Union Pacific Railroad ultimately maintained the existing right-of-way in Anaheim.  The Union Pacific Railroad line in Anaheim joins Santa Ana Street at Philadelphia Street as it curves west from Olive Street.  

The Union Pacific Railroad begins to run in the center turn lane westbound along Santa Ana Street.  Santa Ana Street intersects the original alignment of US Route 101 at Anaheim Boulevard (formerly Los Angeles Street).  

The Union Pacific Railroad continues to run in the center turn lane of Santa Ana Street west to West Street.  From West Street the Union Pacific Railroad splits northwest over the Santa Ana Freeway (Interstate 5).  










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