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The Abandoned New Stanton Interchange Ramps

For nearly 50 years, the Pennsylvania Turnpike interchange with Interstate 70 and US 119 in New Stanton has been a rather free-flowing double trumpet, grade separated interchange between the two freeways.  But for the first 23 years of the turnpike, this interchange was vastly different.  It was the only non-trumpet interchange within the system (excluding termini points) and featured very tricky and gridlock causing left turns within the interchange.  (See image on right).  With the birth of the Interstate Highway System in the mid-1950s, new freeways were built and in many cases the Turnpike kept the original interchange using local roads to connect to the new freeways.  Interchanges with what would become I-81, I-176, I-80, I-70 in Breezewood, and I-79 were left with the original design.

Meanwhile in the 1950's, the state began building a freeway that ran from New Stanton west towards Washington.  This freeway, signed PA 71, was built to connect those in the industrial Mon Valley to the Turnpike.  Opened to the Turnpike by 1959, the amount of traffic using this interchange increased substantially.  It was in October of 1963 that the PTC began a construction project that would cost $1.6 million to completely replace the interchange.  A little over a year later on November 12, 1964, the new New Stanton interchange officially opened to traffic. (1)  This was the first turnpike interchange to be completely replaced, and it also was the first interchange that was reconfigured to provide direct Interstate-to-Interstate traffic.

For years, the were still remnants of the old interchange configuration left.  However, over the past two decades Turnpike mainline widening, construction and tie in to PA Turnpike 66, and the modernization of Interstate 70 in New Stanton has slowly removed pieces of what once was.  In 2003, Bernie Newman captured a number of photos showing the remnants of the old New Stanton interchange.  His photos are below.


The original eastbound New Stanton offramp (Bernie Newman)
A long view of the eastbound offramp.  It is amazing the condition of these old ramps after nearly 40 years.  (Bernie Newman)
The onramp onto the eastbound lanes of the Turnpike.  Recent construction of a new viaduct has created an elevation change from where the onramp would have met the highway.  (Bernie Newman)


The on-ramp to the Turnpike comes at you in this photo.  (Bernie Newman)
A wider shot showing both eastbound ramps.  The ramps are curving to go underneath the Turnpike.  (Bernie Newman)

A ground shot of the surprisingly in good condition pavement used for the ramps.  (Bernie Newman)
Along US 119, the ramps are also found.  Construction of the current New Stanton interchange and the later addition of a connection to PA Turnpike 66 has over time overtaken the ramps to US 119 and the former toll facilities.  (Bernie Newman)
Site Navigation:
Sources & Links:
  • (1) Cupper, Dan. "The Pennsylvania Turnpike: A History.  55th Anniversary Edition."  Lebanon, PA: Applied Arts, 1995. 38-39.
  • Bernie Newman

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