Skip to main content

Road Trip to Triangle Expressway

Last weekend I took by first return to NC road trip to southern Durham and Wake Counties to take my first trip on the Triangle Parkway section of NCTA's Triangle Expressway and to view progress in completing the rest of the toll road to the west and south.

Triangle Parkway
Since Adam has posted photos from the Parkway section, I'll only post a few that are most interesting to me. First, what I never thought I'd see on a NC highway sign:
Toll banners, with other projects underway, there will be more of these. I like the way the bridges are designed...
Brick face on the sides and the roadway number or name carved into the concrete. Upon leaving the parkway, there appears a sign that is temporary:
Since in a few month the toll road will not end. Given this is on the offramp from the Parkway, does this mean NC 540 South starts on the ramp, while NC 540 South still exists on the mainline?

Western Wake Portion of Triangle Expressway (NC 540)
Looks like they've saved a place for the future toll banner here--
The unopened portion of the road looks close to completion, and is almost ready for the next Triangle Expressway Run in August. The view from McCrimmon Parkway to the south--
The final layer of cement is down, there are guardrails and signs up, the only thing that appears missing are lane markers. This is a view looking backward towards the NC 55 exit--
If one looks closely enough, one can see the new overhead signage for the NC 55 exit in the distance. The next bridge carrying Carpenter Fire Station Road over the TriEx is open:
There is still some road work going on here. A view back toward McCrimmon shows exit signs in place:
Along with power distribution lines taking advantage of the new corridor. The view to the south looks toward the first new interchange exit sign and Green Hope School Road:
There is some work still going on toward the center of the picture. A closer view of the text in the sign above is below from just before the Green Hope School Road Bridge--
This is standard design for single exit signage, guess a simple ground mounted sign was not seen as good enough. The number for the exit is 62. 

Here's a similar sign for the NC 55 Exit on North NC 540:

A view looking further south toward the Green Level West interchange area shows work being done on testing the VMS signs:
A closer view of this interchange (and the US 64 interchange signage further in the distance) will have to wait until the next road trip. Here's closeup on the Green Hope School Road Bridge where the above photo was taken:
On the way back I spotted new sign assemblies for Exit 66 that have not been put up lying in the NC 540 median at NC 55-
These should be put up soon, the existing signs I guess could not be easily modified to have exit only tabs attached. 

From back on the open portion of the TriEx --
Showing a new VMS and new North NC 540 sign. And signage approaching the Triangle Parkway with more Toll tabs--
And finally heading under the Kit Creek Parkway Bridge and onto Toll NC 147 North--
The TriEx opening is still planned for August, I hope to get more photos before then.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Former California State Route 24 through the Kennedy Tunnel and Old Tunnel Road

 Near the eastern City Limit of Oakland high in the Berkeley Hills one can be find the ruins of the Kennedy Tunnel at the intersection of Old Tunnel Road and Skyline Boulevard.  The Kennedy Tunnel opened in 1903 and was the first semi-modern automotive corridor which crossed the Alameda County-Contra Costa County Line.  The Kennedy Tunnel even saw service briefly as part of California State Route 24 before the first two bores of the Caldecott Tunnel opened in 1937.   Part 1; the history of the Kennedy Tunnel The genesis point for California State Route 24 ("CA 24") being extended into the San Francisco Bay Area begins a couple years before the Sign State Routes were announced when Legislative Route Number 75 ("LRN 75") was added by 1931 Legislative Chapter 82.  According to cahighways.org the original definition of LRN 75 was as simply "Walnut Creek to Oakland."  The instigator for the adoption of LRN 75 was construct a replacement route for the Ken

The original alignment of California State Route 1 in San Francisco

In 2019 the Gribblenation Blog Series covered the history of the Hyde Street Pier and the original surface alignment of US Route 101 in San Francisco.  Given the Golden Gate Bridge opened to traffic in May of 1937 coupled with the fact that the Sign State Routes had been announced in August of 1934 there were still some open questions regarding the original highway alignments in San Francisco.  Namely the question of this blog is; where was California State Route 1 prior to the completion of the Golden Gate Bridge?  Thanks the to the discovery of a 1936 Shell Highway Map of San Francisco and the California Highways & Public Works the answer can be conveyed clearly.     Part 1; the history of early California State Route 1 in San Francisco The genesis point for California State Route 1 ("CA 1") in San Francisco dates to 1933.  1933 was significant due to the State Legislature allowing the Division of Highways to assume maintenance of highways in Cities for the first time. 

Santa Clara County Route G8 and the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine

Santa Clara County Route G8 is a 29.38 mile County Sign Route which is part of the San Francisco Bay Area transportation corridor.  Santa Clara County Route G8 begins at California State Route 152 near the outskirts of Gilroy and terminates at former US Route 101 at 1st Street/Monterey Road near downtown San Jose.  Santa Clara County Route G8 incorporates the notable Almaden Expressway and is historically tied to the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine.   (Santa Clara County Route G8 map image courtesy CAhighways.org) Part 1; the history of Santa Clara County Route G8, the Almaden Road corridor and New Almaden Mine The present corridor of Santa Clara County Route G8 ("G8") began to take shape with the emergence of the Almaden Expressway.  According to the October 1960 California Highways & Public Works Unit 1 of the Almaden Expressway opened in November of 1959 between Alma Avenue near downtown San Jose south to the Guadalupe River as part of a Federal Highway Aid Secondary pro