Skip to main content

California State Route 200

During 2016 while visiting Northern California I ended up taking California State Route 200 as a cut-off from US Route 101 east to California State Route 299.


CA 200 is a small 3 mile State Highway signed on North Bank Road within Humboldt County near the community of Arcata.  CA 200 follows the north bank of the Mad River and serves as a connector route between US 101 east to CA 299.



Part 1; the history of California State Route 200

North Bank Road along the Mad River existed before it was added to the State Highway System.  North Bank Road can be seen as a connecting road in the vicinity of Arcata between Legislative Route 1 (future US 101) east to Legislative Route 20 (future US 299/CA 299) on the 1917 California State Automobile Association Map of California.


North Bank Road was added to the State Highway System during 1933 as Legislative Route 85.  Legislative Route 85 can be seen aligned between US 101/Legislative Route 1 and US 299/Legislative Route 20 on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Humboldt County.


During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering Legislative Route 85 was assigned CA 200.  The change from Legislative Route 85 to CA 200 can be seen on the 1964 Division of Highways State Map.


CA 200 appears to have been field signed by 1969 as indicated by the Division of Highways State Map from said year.  Since 1969 there has been virtually no changes to CA 200 and the highway has appeared to have always followed the same general alignment on North Bank Road. 



Part 2; a virtual drive on California State Route 200 westbound

Our virtual drive on CA 200 begins on CA 299 westbound.  CA 299 westbound junctions CA 200 westbound at Exit 2.  Note; all below images are take from Google Street View as I didn't have the presence in mind to take a photo log of CA 200 back during 2016.  



CA 200 west is signed as a bicycle route due to the present expressway status of US 101 and CA 299.  CA 200 initially is wide enough shoulder to accommodate bicycle traffic but quickly narrows. 



CA 200 upon narrowing approaches a bluff on the north bank of the Mad River.


CA 200 west continues on a largely direct line whereas the Mad River meanders away via a gooseneck.  Upon pulling away from the Mad River CA 200 opens onto a valley landscape.


At Post Mile HUM 1.293 CA 200 intersects Azalea Avenue which is the access point for Azalea State Reserve.


CA 200 west again meets the Mad River and climbs to a bluff along the north bank.


CA 200 west terminates at the modern US 101 expressway and an at-grade intersection with US 101 Business on Central Avenue.



Part 3; a drive on California State Route 200 eastbound

From US 101 southbound CA 200 begins from Exit 718 at North Bank Road.  CA 200 eastbound begins at the end of the southbound ramp on the US 101 Business Route.





CA 200 eastbound makes a left hand turn at the US 101 northbound ramp at Postmile HUM R0.42 onto North Bank Road.

Azalea State Preserve is signed as 1 mile away on CA 200 east.  CA 299 is signed as 2 miles away on CA 200 east. 

At Postmile HUM 1.289 CA 200 east intersects Azalea Avenue which is signed as access to the Azalea State Reserve. 





CA 200 eastbound follows North Bank Road to a terminus at CA 299.





Comments

Doug-O said…
I am puzzled by the label 'Old Highway 200' that is evident on Google Maps for a road ~5 miles east of the route discussed here that appears to be an old alignment of the Trinity Highway. Why isn't it marked 'Old Highway 299?'

Popular posts from this blog

The original alignment of California State Route 1 in San Francisco

In 2019 the Gribblenation Blog Series covered the history of the Hyde Street Pier and the original surface alignment of US Route 101 in San Francisco.  Given the Golden Gate Bridge opened to traffic in May of 1937 coupled with the fact that the Sign State Routes had been announced in August of 1934 there were still some open questions regarding the original highway alignments in San Francisco.  Namely the question of this blog is; where was California State Route 1 prior to the completion of the Golden Gate Bridge?  Thanks the to the discovery of a 1936 Shell Highway Map of San Francisco and the California Highways & Public Works the answer can be conveyed clearly.     Part 1; the history of early California State Route 1 in San Francisco The genesis point for California State Route 1 ("CA 1") in San Francisco dates to 1933.  1933 was significant due to the State Legislature allowing the Division of Highways to assume maintenance of highways in Cities for the first time. 

Santa Clara County Route G8 and the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine

Santa Clara County Route G8 is a 29.38 mile County Sign Route which is part of the San Francisco Bay Area transportation corridor.  Santa Clara County Route G8 begins at California State Route 152 near the outskirts of Gilroy and terminates at former US Route 101 at 1st Street/Monterey Road near downtown San Jose.  Santa Clara County Route G8 incorporates the notable Almaden Expressway and is historically tied to the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine.   (Santa Clara County Route G8 map image courtesy CAhighways.org) Part 1; the history of Santa Clara County Route G8, the Almaden Road corridor and New Almaden Mine The present corridor of Santa Clara County Route G8 ("G8") began to take shape with the emergence of the Almaden Expressway.  According to the October 1960 California Highways & Public Works Unit 1 of the Almaden Expressway opened in November of 1959 between Alma Avenue near downtown San Jose south to the Guadalupe River as part of a Federal Highway Aid Secondary pro

California State Route 1 the Shoreline Highway Part 3; a drive through Mendocino County

This blog is Part 3 of a three part series on of the Shoreline Highway segment of California State Route 1 and features a drive through Mendocino County.  Part 2 found below features a drive through Marin County.  California State Route 1 the Shoreline Highway Part 2; a drive through Sonoma County Chapter 4; California State Route 1/Shoreline Highway through Mendocino County Upon crossing the Gualala River and entering Mendocino County CA 1 northbound traverses into Gualala at Postmile MEN 1.2. The land which the community of Gualala now sits was part of a 1844 Mexican Land Grant to General Rafael Garcia between the Gualala River and Mal Paso Creek.  After the Mexican-American War the State of California invalidated Garcia's Land Grant which was made it available to homesteaders.  In 1861 Cyrus Robinson filed a claim under the provisions of the 1820 Land Act on land upon which the community of Gualala now sits.  Soon a saloon, hotel and ferry would develop which formed the basis of