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I-74/US 311 Freeway Progress for August, Part 1

I traveled Sunday 8/29 to view the latest progress on the I-74/US 311 Freeway between Business 85 in High Point and US 220 in Randleman, plus check up on the new construction project along 220 in Asheboro. During the visit from Cedar Square Road south I followed along with Bill Travers, a local resident who has been helping me keep up to date on area construction projects. Part 1 will describe progress on Phase 1 of the project from Business 85 to Spencer Road, while Part 2 will describe progress and new locations to view Phase 2 to US 220 and remark about changes in plans for this part of highway since the Design-Build section was let.

Part 1 - Business 85 to Spencer Road
A. Baker Road
As seen in the photo below, the last grading of the temporary road has been completed, the ground now needs seeding and wet weather for something to grow on it:
The views to the south and north actually look less complete than last month due to landscaping work covering up the completed asphalt roadway. Here's a view to the north:
They also seem to be laying cable along the side of the roadway. The view to the south:
shows the need for more landscaping toward the bridge and covers for the median catch basins.

B. Jackson Lake Road Bridge
Some changes here, beginning with the landscaping around the bridge. The former truck entry road has been graded over and become a grassy area:
This is a definite sign construction is wrapping up in this area, another sign are signs, or structures to hold them placed in both directions west of the bridge:
The left gantry is for the I-85 exit, the one on the left Business 85. Remaining landscaping has to be completed as well as sign placement. Looking east also shows some landscaping work remains...
Plus catch basin work. Though there is an addition of shoulder guard rails and median guide wires.

C. Kersey Valley Road Bridge
Major progress in this area on guard rails, as one can see in the photo below:
The truck access road, seen in the foreground, is still being used. Looking south reveals more guardrail progress as well as successful landscaping that almost needs to be mowed...
They also need to put up another sign gantry, I assume this is the 2 mile sign for the Business 85 Exit. Successful landscaping along the eastbound roadway has been mixed:
You would think more effort would be made to get the slope to look good, because the Blythe Construction contractor offices are located at the top of the hill. Looking at the I-85 interchange from Dresden Road...
It appears most of the work has been completed, though this is from some distance away.

D. NC 62, Tuttle Road, and Poole Road showed little change with similar need for completing some landscaping, adding some guardrails, and completing catch basins.

E. Cedar Square Valley Bridge and Interchange
Most of the remaining paving needed to open the road has been completed, as seen looking north from the Cedar Square Road Bridge back toward the Poole Road bridge...
The eastbound off ramp is completed as well as the westbound lanes back to the Cedar Square on ramp. The view below is of the completed on ramp intersection with Cedar Square Rd...
The construction equipment in the distance is grading the remaining roadbed toward Spencer Road. This is what it looks like from the bridge:
The paving of this section has been transferred to the Barnhill Construction, the firm doing the design/build phase 2 of the project. The contractor for Phase 1, Blythe Construction was having trouble this spring purchasing enough asphalt for its many projects. The equipment seen in the distance is actually on the other side of Spencer Road. Construction from there to US 220 will be the subject of the second part of this report.

Comments

Bob Malme said…
An update as to completion progress. According to the NCDOT Construction Progress Report, the Business 85 to Spencer Road portion was 93.56% complete as of the end of August.

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