Skip to main content

Could it be true..I-485 to finally open in two week (aka The News 14 Carolina Story I could have been on)

We've been waiting for oh...over a year and a half now ...but there's light at the end of the I-485 Construction Tunnel! Yes, the infamous, Charlotte construction project is almost done and ready for traffic. I-485 from NC 16 to I-77/NC 115 in Huntersville might open by the end of this month!

Yes, I said that the next segment of I-485 (NC 16 to I-77/NC 115 in Huntersville) could possibly open by the end of the month.

I was so shocked I had to type it twice...just to believe it.

The contractor has a target date of opening of Halloween (October 31st) for completion of the often delayed, often bungled 5.5 miles of highway.

Of course if it decides to rain a bit over the next few weeks...that could be pushed back. (Not like we haven't seen that before.)

News Stories:
I-485 closer to completion ---News 14 Carolina (Includes video)
Another stretch of I-485 close to completion ---Charlotte Observer

Commentary:
Well, RickMastFan67 picked November 1st. So if it opens the 31st or the 1st, he'll win a prize.

All I can say it's about time, there have been so many issues with building this highway...it was hard to keep track of (amazingly the last six months went along quietly...amazingly and thankfully that is).

This is big piece of the I-485 as this now offers traffic from I-77 North of Charlotte (Statesville, Huntersville, Davidson) a quicker option and bypass to get to I-85 South (or west of Charlotte) to places like Gastonia, the Upstate of South Carolina, and Atlanta. It will make a huge local and long-distance traffic shift after it opens.

Oh, I'm visiting friends in Charlotte the weekend of November 14th...so as long as the road is open...I'll get photos of the new highway at that time.

As for the other part of the title, I received an e-mail yesterday morning from the News 14 Carolina reporter, Shannon Paluso, asking to possibly interview me about the project specifically all of the delays in construction and the funding issues that have pushed finishing the entire loop back a number of years. Unfortuanately, I didn't get to the e-mail last night...and of course I live in Raleigh...which is about a 2.5 to 3 hour drive from that part of Mecklenburg County. Oh well, it's still nice to be considered for inclusion as part of the story.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge - Maine

  Spanning over the Ossipee River on the border between Porter in Oxford County, Maine and Parsonsfield in York County, Maine is the 152 foot long Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge. The Porter-Parsonsfield Bridge is built in a Paddleford truss design, which is commonly found among covered bridges in the New England states. The covered bridge is the third bridge located at this site, with the first two bridges built in 1800 and 1808. However, there seems to be some dispute for when the covered bridge was built. There is a plaque on the bridge that states that the bridge may have been built in 1876, but in my research, I have found that this bridge may have been built in 1859 instead. That may check out since a number of covered bridges in northern New England were built or replaced around 1859 after a really icy winter. The year that the Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge was built was not the only controversy surrounding its construction. There was a dispute over building and maintain

Route 75 Tunnel - Ironton, Ohio

In the Ohio River community of Ironton, Ohio, there is a former road tunnel that has a haunted legend to it. This tunnel was formerly numbered OH 75 (hence the name Route 75 Tunnel), which was renumbered as OH 93 due to I-75 being built in the state. Built in 1866, it is 165 feet long and once served as the northern entrance into Ironton, originally for horses and buggies and later for cars. As the tunnel predated the motor vehicle era, it was too narrow for cars to be traveling in both directions. But once US 52 was built in the area, OH 93 was realigned to go around the tunnel instead of through the tunnel, so the tunnel was closed to traffic in 1960. The legend of the haunted tunnel states that since there were so many accidents that took place inside the tunnel's narrow walls, the tunnel was cursed. The haunted legend states that there was an accident between a tanker truck and a school bus coming home after a high school football game on a cold, foggy Halloween night in 1

US Route 299 and modern California State Route 299

US Route 299 connected US Route 101 near Arcata of Humboldt County east across the northern mountain ranges of California to US Route 395 in Alturas of Modoc County.  US Route 299 was the longest child route of US Route 99 and is the only major east/west highway across the northern counties of California.  US Route 299 was conceptualized as the earliest iteration of what is known as the Winnemucca-to-the-Sea Highway.  The legacy of US Route 299 lives on today in the form of the 307 mile long California State Route 299.   Featured as the cover of this blog is the interchange of US Route 101 and US Route 299 north of Arcata which was completed as a segment of the Burns Freeway during 1956.   Part 1; the history of US Route 299 and California State Route 299 The development of the State Highways which comprised US Route 299 ("US 299") and later California State Route 299 ("CA 299") began with 1903 Legislative Chapter 366 which defined the general corridor of the Trinit