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Hey how about that I updated...

Well after some traveling, some softball, and some procrastination (ok, a lot of it - I confess). I've finished up a bit of updating to Georgia, Florida and Tennessee.

A few weeks ago, Doug suggested that we talk about our updates on the blog, and I had done that at one point and this gives me a great excuse to start it up again.

Let's start with the bigger of the three state updates - Tennessee.

First is a feature on the SmartFIX40 project in Knoxville. In May, Joe was out that way and sent me some photos and a video of the project. I blogged about here, and it's now on a dedicated page. The page allows room to expand with more photos from myself or others, and with a Knoxville Road Meet being planned in the fall - there certainly will be more to add in the upcoming months.

The one thing that I lack on the page is a decent map of the area. Whether created via a design program or scanned. I personally don't have the knowledge to do such design. But we'll see if I can get some help on that.

Next, a non-road feature (within the hobby I'm slightly different since I do a number of non-road but more travel feature pages for the site) on Lynchburg, TN and the Jack Daniel's Distillery. Kristy and I toured the area during Billy's wedding in March, and really enjoyed the tour. We even took home some 1981 Gold Medal Whiskey of our own.

I also wanted to do a page on Shelbyville, TN. But at this point decided to hold off. It would be a few photos of the town but nothing really to do a feature on at this point. So for now, the flickr set will work.

With these updates, Tennessee now has three features and the sign gallery. I need to consider creating an index page and possibly making Tennessee a full state feature site on gn.com.

Georgia:

I did quite a few gallery updates - Georgia seems to constantly get the most submissions of any of the state galleries I run. I decided to pass on a small feature on Neel's Gap in North Georgia. Doug had sent me about eight photos - that I wanted to use - but I couldn't figure out what to write about it vs. just "here's photos of Neel's Gap, Georgia." That's something that didn't work out for me.

I really need to make a Georgia Index page and a name for the site. If you have suggestions, you know what to do.

Florida - Just a photo to the gallery. I have received in the past few days some photos from JP Nasiatka to look through so maybe some more next time. I need to make another trip down there!

Coming up a set of updates in Vermont. Something I have been looking forward to doing for quite sometime.

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