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All Things NC! Update Thoughts

This past week I have been working on an All Things NC! Update. I formally announced it today. There are a few things in the update that I am very happy about.

First, the opportunity to have memories of what I like to call my second home, Gaston County. One of the routes NC 274, I lived off of and my work was off of it so I was on it daily. But also in doing the updates top the pages for NC 161, 273, 274, and 275, I recalled all the times I saw the termini. Also, each of them had photos I took of my own when I lived there. I could remember a lot of it. Some like the ends for 161 and 275 I took in April of 2001 when I first moved there. It was really my first exploration of the county and it was the first trip that really allowed me to call the area home. Other photos were taken in the summer of 2001 and I just remember how the area was along the border. It was a nice surprise to get those photos in the mail.

Another Gaston County memory was the abandoned I-85 ramps near Eastridge Mall. These ramps were once part of a connector between Franklin Blvd. and I-85. It also was a temporary end of the highway around 1963. Now it serves as an access road and a bypass of heavy traffic around I-85 and Cox Road. I never got down to take photos (I also didn't have a digital camera then) and I was surprised to see that a lot of the paint on the old ramps are still there. Chris Curley took great shots as always.

Oriental, NC is another one of my favorite places. I really grew attached to the place in taking sailing lessons from a work colleague in 2004. I added five photos taken December 2004 the last time I was out there. I moved to NY in February-March 2005. The sunset bridge photo was the subject of my 2005 Christmas Cards. I showed Craig and his wife the page, and they both commented, "Looks awesome, but it needs more photos, when are you coming back down?"

I am very proud of the I-40 History Page. It really is the first detailed NC Road History page I have done. It has been on the drawing board for about three years. What I find the most amazing about the entire backstory is that, the state really has tried for 40 years to build interstates to Morehead City and Wilmington. Oddly, what I-40 became was never part of either the 1963, 1968, or 1970 proposals. Plus, I do wonder what the three spur proposals made in 1959 entailed. As always, there are new questions to ask. Why were the various proposals rejected in 1963 and 1970. Were there more made in 1968? Were there more made in other years? When and why did Gov. Hunt change I-40 to go to Wilmington? Was there really any consideration for I-40 going to Morehead City. And as some have suggested, are the upgrades to US 70 part of a compromise to Morehead when they lost out on I-40. However, the page is now out there, and who knows more leads can come from that.

I did not do two items to the update. The 4 US 70's of Selma/Smithfield I decided to hold since Brian LeBlanc is hoping to get photos next weekend. I also decided to not add some of the older postcards of the Central Highway because I'm not exactly sure what my plans for them are at this time.

So what is next: Virgina...cutouts and signs..Mike Roberson sent me some US 15 photos, I have some photos of my own, and i may extend US 29 to DC with some information onthe Lee Highway. Depends on how much information I can dig up.

Florida...Steve Williams has sent me some photos and I am trying to get some more before I introduce a page. Hopefully, the next roll of film will have more St. Augustine photos and I can tie that in with a gallery.

Comments

Enjoyed the I-40 history page.

Great work as always, Adam! :)

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