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Tunica, Mississippi


Tunica is a small, quiet town off US 61 in Northwest Mississippi.  The community of about 1,000 residents is the county seat of Tunica County - both named after the Tunica Tribe.  Today, the community is more known for the nearby resorts and casinos along the Mississippi River.

A quiet Tunica on a warm July Sunday afternoon.

Tunica was laid out in 1884 on land owned by Edwin Harris.  Like many towns formed during the time, railroad access was the key driver in creating Tunica.  Harris sold plots of his land for the town in exchange for a coveted railroad depot.  A unique part of Harris' transfer of land is that he required that Tunica be a regularly scheduled rail stop vs. a flag stop.

Tunica's Town Clock within the village green.  The Tunica County Courthouse stands in the background.

In 1888, the town of Tunica was incorporated.  Later, railroad officials would try to end service in Tunica.  However, the clause from Harris' land transfer kept service alive.  Passenger rail service would eventually be terminated.

Downtown Tunica

With the opening of resort casinos in the early 1990s, the area surrounding Tunica has seen growth and improvement.  A nearby airport opened in 2003 that has offered commercial air service.  Charter flights to the resort communities remain very popular.  Through all the changes and benefits, the town of Tunica remains a quiet and charming small town.

All photos taken by post author - July 2023.

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