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Interstate 795 Repaving Job Wins Award

Remember about four years ago when potholes started to pop up throughout the recently opened Interstate 795?  The one that cost about $12 million to repair with thicker and better asphalt?

Well, that project recently won an award.  The National Asphalt Pavement Association awarded the 2011 Sheldon G. Hayes Award for excellence in asphalt pavement construction to contractor S.T. Wooten and NCDOT.  The signs recognizing this achievement were put up on I-795 this week. I captured the new award sign this evening with my iPhone on my way home tonight.


S.T. Wooten repaved 8 miles (miles 6 - 14) of I-795 at a cost of $5.9 million.  Barnhill Contracting Company did the other half of the repave at a cost of $6.1 million.  The new sign claims that I-795 is the "Smoothest Road in the Nation." I drive this road frequently, and I must admit, it's actually a pretty smooth drive.  So the bigger question is - how long will this project hold up? And why didn't the state use the 8" layer of asphalt vs. 5" in the first place?

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/03/07/1910790/rebuilt-interstate-795-wins-awards.html#storylink=cpy to

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