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Vacation to Cherry Grove Beach, SC - Part 2 - The Drives

I'm combining all of the trips down and back into one post here.

We were going to leave Friday evening, but because of the landfall of Tropical Storm Hanna, and the 5" of rain we received here in Raleigh. I didn't get on the road til about 11 am on Saturday.

Trip Down - I-440, I-40, I-95, US 74, US 701. SC 9 Business, SC 9.
Side Trip Sunday Afternoon - SC 65 - US 17, SC/NC 179, NC 179 Business, NC 179, NC 904, NC 179, NC 130, US 17, SC 9.
Trip Back to Raleigh: SC 9 - US 701 - US 701 Business (Tabor City) - US 701 - NC 242 - I-40 - I-440.

Accomplishments - Added mileage to US 74 and 76, SC 9 Business, NC 904, NC 130, US 701, and NC 242.

Clinched: SC 65 and NC 179.

The entire flickr set (133 photos) is here.

No pictures on the trip down. I took a quick glimpse at the soon to be open I-74/US74 interchange with I-95. The overhead guide signs are uncovered on the South I-95 C/D lanes - and it's interesting to see I-74/US 74 shields next to each other on an overhead.

At US 17 and Main St. in North Myrtle Beach. There is construction of a four lane highway that looks like will extend Main Street to the Carolina Bays Parkway. If so, could this be the possible I-174 that has been discussed before.

Sunday's small trip was two hours to get a few more southern Brunswick County routes...and to hit the Sunset Beach Pontoon Bridge in action before it is removed in about two years.



Next up was NC 904 at Ocean Isle Beach. NC 904's Eastern End is now a roundabout, and it actually looks pretty good.

However, there is this rather ugly and non-traditional NC 904 shield installed by the contractor.

Now for the drive home.

Now I know, South Carolina has changed their state highway shield design. (Only saw one on this entire trip.) But it appears there was a little known change to match Massachusetts, Connecticut, or Maine prior to that.

There are a handful of these generic 9 shields around the SC 9/SC 31 interchange.

Took US 701 Business in Tabor City. It's actually a decently sized down town for a small town. It has rail tracks run through the heart of town.


Caught the western end of NC 411 just south of Roseboro.


There is a Truck NC 242 bypass of Roseboro.

North of Roseboro at this former grocery and gas station. I found an old sign for Pine State Ice Cream. Now I have seen signs for Pine State Milk, but never Pine State Ice Cream.

Of course...NC 242 (along with US 421) heads through Spivey's Corner. Which is home to the annual Pig Hollerin Festival in June.

Comments

Steve A said…
It appears that you're only welcome to Spivey's Corners during the pig festival.
Anonymous said…
Seems like you also love to travel just like me.

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