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Tri-Ex Progress Photos

Given that this day is often devoted to leftovers, I thought I'd add at least one leftover post from NC. This from the trip Adam Prince and I took on October 17 to note progress on the two portions of the Triangle Parkway which took over 4 hours and stretched from the end of NC 147 in Durham to US 1 in Apex. Needless to say, a lot there to see for roads that won't be completed until at least the end of next year. I'll post photos and comments heading north to south.

I Triangle Parkway
A. Hopson Road Bridge and Interchange-
Not much had changed at NC 54, so we moved onto Hopson Road. Here, the temporary road to take traffic around the future bridge construction appeared complete:
It better be, because it is made up of three layers of asphalt to support construction vehicle traffic, as can be seen below:

B. Davis Drive-Work had begun on the northern support structure for the Triangle Parkway bridge:
If you remember the previous post of the southern part of this bridge, the architectural extras will include brick portions as well as concrete.

C. Kit Creek Parkway Bridge
Progress was seen in placing the bridge decks across a couple of the support beams:
This being the part of the bridge that will go over the southbound parkway as it starts to merge with NC 540. The supports were up on the other side to accept a bridge deck in the near future:
Beyond is the old Davis Drive exit ramp which will be transformed to connect into the Parkway. The center span, as of now, will only be serving construction trucks on the way to and from the temporary cement plant:
The purpose of a roadway here when construction is finished is unknown. Maybe it will be used to service the toll devices to be used by traffic on NC 540 West taking the Parkway (see below).
The bridges themselves are to receive architectural flourishes of their own. One of them can be seen here:
I wonder where they got the idea for a flower design accent for the bridge?:
No similar features are seen on the bridge ends, in this case the western end:
Besides the bridges, work is proceeding to grade the parkway back to Davis Drive:
D. Triangle Parkway Toll Structures
Cashless toll systems will be installed along the TriEx. One of the areas where they've started to make their appearance is the large former Davis Drive Interchange:
The ramp to the right is the future on ramp to Toll NC 147, the Triangle Parkway north. Closer to the construction area, one can see the future cashless toll structures being put up:
The left side structures appear near completion, while work had just started on the right-side.

II. The Western Wake Freeway
A. End of NC 540
As can be seen from the photos below, a lot of progress had been made since September as seen from the current end of NC 540 West. First, the former slope has been filled in, producing a slow downward grade toward the bridges under construction:
Second, asphalt has been placed on the freeway beyond the bridge decks under construction. Here's a closer look at the bridges and beyond:
The north/east bound deck appears complete while concrete pouring has not been completed on the other side.

B. McCrimmon Parkway Bridge
The asphalt layer continues past Panther Creek High School:
And under the nearly completed span of the McCrimmon Parkway Bridge:
Here's a view of what the bridge deck looked like in mid-October:
C. Carpenter Fire Station Road
The asphalt layer continues south from McCrimmon Parkway to the site of the future bridge for Carpenter Fire Station Road, here seen in the distance:
For now a ramp has been constructed to take construction equipment up across the road and back down to the freeway, the completion of a temporary road will allow for bridge construction to begin.

D. Green Level School Road
Bridge work has not started here either as can be seen from the south at the site of the USA Baseball Complex:
In this case the existing road will serve as the route around the bridge construction. Here's the view looking further south toward Green Level West and the site of the next interchange:
The expanded clearing in the distance are for the future southbound off and northbound on ramps.

E. Green Level West Road
The site of the future interchange is also the site of the contractor offices and, due to the proximity, a lot of grading and bridge work:
There's a large clear space across the freeway ROW, unknown if this is for the future off ramp or a relocation of the contractor offices:
Here's a view looking north back at Green Level Church Road:
F. Jenks Road
Adam and I took a turn off NC 55 here to see what was being done to this road which had eventually intersected with US 64, the next interchange on the Freeway. Turns out the road had just been closed since the Freeway ROW and US 64 interchanges crossed it. We walked the 1/4 of closed road but could not tell if this is a permanent cut-off or temporary. As for the view, the contractors had graded and dug up material which they placed in a pile:
It is unknown if what's in the pile will serve any purpose in construction, for now it is useful as a good vantage point to check freeway progress to the north:
While the trees have been cleared, it is unknown whether the road to the right will serve as part of the freeway or the US 64 off ramp. Taking a look to the south, one can see how close you are to US 64 and the interchange/bridge construction going on there:
The cranes in the distance are on the opposite side of the future bridge over US 64.

G. US 64 Interchange
This interchange will serve US 64 and also have a ramp for nearby Kelly Road. Here's looking at the bridge traveling on West 64:
The northside bridge work is mostly complete, as seen here in close up:
As are the median supports, much work has to be done on the south side. Here's the progress in clearing for the freeway and interchange as seen from 64 eastbound:
H. Apex Barbecue Road
The freeway will cross over Apex Barbecue Road about a mile south of US 64. Here's a view of progress in clearing looking back toward US 64:
There is less progress looking south from the same location:
Many trucks, but just clearing, little grading up and over the hill. One curiosity at this spot was the presence of many 'tree protection area' signs which seemed to not have done much good, unless bulldozers are counted as trees:
I. Old US 1
About 2 miles further south is to be the location of the next interchange at Old US 1. It is here the continuous clearing for the freeway ends, due to railroad tracks that exist south of Old US 1. The view north does show some progress in clearing the land:
As you can see, little grading had occurred yet, and there were several ponds that will need to be drained. We were also curious as to what would become of the house below on the edge of the clearing area:
It appeared to be in the way of the future northbound on ramp.

J. Beyond Old US 1
We finished our trip heading down to US 1 and proceeding back toward Raleigh. Though there was no evidence of construction on US 1 itself, some clearing could be seen as having taken place just north of the roadway. Maybe by this time construction is more evident. Hopefully, there will be more updates in the future from the remaining Raleigh Roads Crew.

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