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Happy 4th and FL/GA/TN update review

Happy Independence Day to everyone! I hope everyone is taking some time off to enjoy our great nation's birthday. Myself, I have been taking the day off to catch up around the house, clean out the SUV, work on some pages, and have time to enjoy the rest of the day.

I announced updates to three states today. Florida, Georgia and Tennessee.

Florida:

I added over 35 photos from JP Natsiatka and one from myself to the gallery. JP, who had been hoping that gn.com would add Florida, sent in and continues to send in photos from throughout Florida. I added one photo of my own from the trip to St. Augustine in May 2004.

Speaking of St. Augustine...I added to the St. Augustine features. First, a new page on the Castillo de San Marcos. A impressive fort that has stood the test of time, and a few attacks, since the late 1600's. It's very cool to tour and explore, one thing I didn't realize was that there is a shuttle ferry to Fort Matanzas from the park grounds. I guess it proves that you can't always see everything!

Next are some random shots throughout St. Augustine that filled out a roll of film. They are from St. George Street and of a few statues. Finally, I did in fact have a photo of one of the marble lions that guard the Bridge of Lions. Well right now they are not. They have been moved to a safe place while the Bridge of Lions gets totally rehabbed.

Georgia & Tennessee:

Nine photos in Georgia and one in Tennessee added. Steve Williams sent in some neat finds in and around Athens, and Billy Riddle shares two photos from I-75.

A sneak preview:

West Virginia - Not much here, but ends from newly signed WV 193. And some Corridor H informational updates. I may start to piece together a Corridor L (US 19) page.

Pennsylvania: Is going to be busy. First at least 30 new keystones. Then more ENDS. The new PA 290 and a lot of other updated ends. Plus some odd signs here and there. Plus, I have been fortunate to gain permission to display the photography of Fred Yenerall, who took numerous sign photos -- mainly keystones -- throughout PA in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. There are at least 70 keystones so far I have access to among other signs. Mr. Yenerall also had taken numerous pictures of covered bridges, old barns (Mail Pouch included), and other old buildings throughout the state and Ohio. I will have a direct link set up to his other photos.

South Carolina - A lot of I-73 and Carolina Bays Parkway to talk about and even some photos.

North Carolina - Busy again. Roundabouts, an abandoned/seldom used weigh station, more ENDS, signs, new information on I-40's history and US 70, and a look at the original Independence Blvd. in Charlotte.

Virginia - Already more cutouts and signs have been sent in. Plus, I'll try to add another segment to the Lee Highway Page.

Florida/Georgia/Alabama - Already have new material in. It will be added after West Virginia.

Another roll of film will be developed...Only three rolls to go. What is in there I don't know.

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